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are in a no growth environment. they are getting in the way of growth. the news in europe is extremely bad and going to get worse. their economy looks just absolutely horrible. stuart: they give very much, indeed. a very clean cut opinion. we appreciate that. thank you very much. the opening bell coming up 20 seconds from now. maybe a gain of ten-15 points. please remember we were down 138 points yesterday. 352,000 new claims for unemployment insurance. that was last week. that is a relative high number. nothing like what you expected. firing trend, the layoff trend still very much with us. we opened 11 points higher. now, we are up 23. let's get right to it. apple. where did it open today? nicole petallides. nicole: at least they have an up arrow today. we have to keep a close eye on apple. people who own apple not only is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault righ
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
our green is universal with green beer. we mean beer production that goes easy on the environment. it's an interesting story and iex breaking right here squawk this morning. miller coor's is reporting that its famous golden colorado brewery, the largest single site brewery on the planet is now weeks away from becoming a zero waste site. what does that moon exactly? more than 99% of brewery waste, glass, plastic, even spent grain gets reused or recycled. interesting story behind this initiative, the idea came from a long time employee, a shop floor technician there with the initial plan to get the company's major breweries to zero waste. for much more on earth week and this story and others, check out green.cnbc.com. kind of an interesting feel good -- and it has to do with beer and drinking. >> i didn't know this. jane wells and tom rotuna on the on assignment desk are doing this whole thing called brew and chew. >> i read about this, too. it's going the be online. >> on cnbc.com. it's all about beer news, food news. jane wells, i saw her in california two weeks ago. she said she prom
a little bit. the analyst at deutsche bank said considering this macro environment chipolte might not want to do that so quickly. there is so much competition in share of your stomach pace, right with burger king, panera, and mcdonald's. they are all doing restaurant innovations and menu changes appeal to customers who are watching their every penny. back to you. david: thanks, lauren. have a good weekend. liz: the burrito bowl is popular item at fox business because they're just across the street. >>> major airlines in america have a new destination and that is federal court. david: they're suing the government. they're hoping to head off expected big flight delays that are coming next week or expected for next week. jeff flock following that story at o'hare international air board in chicago. jeff, what is the story? >> they say the government could stop this if it wanted to but they're using it as a political football. look at this for example. this is weather day. see all the yellow? those are all delayed flights. this is typical weather day. they say that will be like that every day f
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
there is almost a divorce on how earnings and economies grow. connell: how does that environment sustain itself? >> is it sustainable in the long run, no. that means over a ten year cycle. i am focused over the next year or two years. earnings can continue to grow because we see 20% of s&p 500 companies hoarding. only 45% have beat revenues. i think that we could be in a period of time where we have a divergence in the markets between those that are doing really well and those that are not doing really well at all. you could get a lot of disparities. connell: brian jacobson, wells fargo, thank you very much. appreciate it. >> thank you. dagen: rilling knowing about it through minor. connell: at&t versus google. we will tell you why. we will keep an eye on the market. a big day today. oil is down. we will be back with much more on market now. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its ovell reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved.
the internet, either at home or at the office or in the retail environment. so we're orienting everything we're doing at ebay, ebay, inc., to help consumers have a seamless shopping experience. >> john, last question i have, if there's one danger that i see particularly for paypal, it is scrappy competitors coming up, what you talked about last time you and i talked, braintree, et cetera, that have gotten some of the hot mobile retail start-ups under their wing. what's the major ting that ebay has to do to get the next fab, the next uber, for instance, under the paypal wing? >> well, there's going to be a lot of innovation in mobile payments and in this whole space because there's so much change. weened that. we actually respect and like that. we made several acquisitions. but we're innovating aggressively as well. we just launched our new mobile software library at south by southwest and actually companies like uber, companies like fab are using paypal and integrating paypal because paypal brings 120 million active consumers. paypal brings a network of capability that is strong. and so ther
environment. so we think they have got a number of positive stimuli going forward. probably a cheap as pe that emc has had for several years. lori: gene, make us some money here if you would. really interesting defensive stocks really led this rally. what do you think if we're coming down now? >> well, you know, leadership has been in a lot of different areas, and not just year-to-date but over the last year-and-a-half. david: forgive me, guys, i have got to break in here. we have american express express earnings. dennis, what are the numbers? >> yes the numbers beat the street on earnings but fall below revenue. street wanted 8.03 billion. earnings per share, american express, 1.15 a share. street was thinking $1.12. that is a beat. quarterlyly dividend for amex raised 15%. the company will spend $3.2 billion extra this year on stock buybacks before year-end and another one billion dollars in the first quarter of 2014. stock buybacks support a stock price. can't tell, looks like amex might head down. wall street hate as miss even though earnings beat. lori: todd horowitz, earnings seaso
with our reduced output so the faith is still there, that it's well run in a bad macro economic environment which comes back to mcdonald's which you have a note out today from sus can dehanna which says it is executing across the world and it is stable in its market share or gaining and it is against it. that seems to be the major theme. >> another theme that's sort of emerged in these big companies, citigroup, as well is the strength of the latin american consumer and the latin american corporation. caterpillar noting that lshg, even though china continues to be weak and there seems to be a shift from asia pacific to latin america coming from these multinationals. >> resuming the buyback does not hurt by the end of the year. it had approved for a while in '07. >> and that might be taking some of the sting out of this today. >> when we come back, yet another price target cut for apple ahead of its earnings and this time from bmo. colin gilles over at bgc is upgrading the stock this morning. which one is right? we'll hear from both analysts this morning. the dow coming off its worst week sin
're in a zero yield environment. if you provide a little extra, investors are really happy about that. liz: good to see you tom. speaking about ipos and talking about, that i will speak with the ceo of seaworld as i mentioned that is tomorrow on the "countdown to the closing bell". that is -- the closing bell. maybe? james atchison. we'll have him. david: you like fairway? liz: i do. you know why? because the cheese is so much less than at whole foods. david: been years since i eat cheese. some the workers that say you pay your taxes are scramming the system and stealing your tax dollars. the details of this story are going to make you furious. might want to get the kid out of the room. that is next. liz: google starting to distribute pricey brand new internet connected glasses called google glass. we want to know if you would fork over $1500 a pair? log on to facebook.co facebook.com/afterthebell. tell us what you think. we'll read your comments later this hour. ♪ . are you still sleeping? just wanted check and make sure that we were on schedule. the first chnology of its kind... mom and dad
environment even more. i think you have a great, virtuous cycle that's kicking in. >> that cuts to the fundamental question about netflix whether it's growing fast enough to pay for the international expansion and to pay for the content bills that it's rack up. >> if you look in detail at these figures who which you have to still, the loss overseas is $77 million and the negative free cash flow is 42 million, tony. >> there are a couple of things that have gone on in this quarter. one, we do see these improvements in the use of accounts payable which in the cash flow and the u.s. streaming business scale better which should provide more cash flow and the dvd business is not declining as fast and these guys are managing the business pretty well. if i can on the international, it's down, but not down as much assy we expected and the way to think about that is maybe these international markets are getting to profitability sooner than expected and it may not be as big of a drag as people thought going in. they're focusing on traditional valuation in the near-term. i think what the s
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
't replace the wild west environment with a legal situation. >> let me ask another question. techis that the highest end. i'm thinking of a rhode island business that has a high technical level of accomplishment. they don't have a colossal hr department. they work in a particular niche, when they can identify the person they need as the person they need, there may be the person with a skill set like that anywhere to be found. if you need a specific profile in dover, does this give you the capability to reach outnd recrthat person? the concern i ve heard from these businesses ieven iyou have heard from this person and start recruiting them, it creates so much uncertainty and delay and havoc that if they have an international capability, they will go wherever -- to germany, india or china. are you comfortable we can compete with those kind of people where there is a specific person you are looking for? >> i think the bill seeks a number of important steps. is of the points you hit on just by going to brown, the ph going to a hospital. help, ashe numbers long as we avoidniend consequen
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14